Author Topic: rattle can paint restoration  (Read 6275 times)

egibbons

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rattle can paint restoration
« on: June 03, 2002, 06:09:00 PM »
I thought I'd get some actual tips started in the tips & tricks section. I just finished doing a spot restoration of paint on my 1978 Dodge rear kitchen Clipper. This mainly included re-doing some poor quality fiberglass repair on rear of the camper, and repainting the entire hood section. I thought I'd pass along some products I used to do the work.

Marine-Tex is a two part epoxy compound real good for repairing fiberglass. It has about a 1 hour working time. You can use a razor blade to squeegee it into hairline cracks too. Find it at a boating store.

For paint, I was able to find rattle cans that closely match the clipper colors. Krylon's 1504 Ivory is a great match for the van body & camper. If anything, it's a tiny bit light. Only I can notice it. My wife thinks it's a perfect match. For the brown stripe I used Krylon's 2501 Leather Brown. A little on the dark side, it's still a close match. Hardest to match in a rattle can is the Burnt Orange. I used Premium Decor's PDS-24 Banner Orange (General Paint & Mfg. Co.). The paint is clearly more vivid than the original. It reminds me of what the stripe may have looked like before 24 years of fading. Rubbing out the stripe in the ajoining area minimized the color difference, but it is still substantially brighter than the original strip. Still it's the closest I could find off the shelf and it looks great. Alternately, for those purists, an old Journal listed the correct paint (not a rattle can) as PPG Delstar Acrilic Enamel - Panama Brown formula #3007 + 1/2 tsp black/pint. Apparently it was used on 1970s Volkswagens). Remember when doing any of this type of work to follow the can instructions, and to prep your work. Pick up a can of surface prep (wax & oil remover) from a local auto paint store, when you pick up a variety of sandpapers, and automotive quality masking tape (the green stuff). Good Luck, and happy Clippering.

Eric Gibbons #3021

Mark Smith

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rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2002, 03:45:00 AM »
Since you have already painted your Clipper. this info will be of little use to you. However, for anyone reading this, be aware that the exact  original paint receipies are printed in Newsletter (approx) number 37.  The only color not available is the orange from 1978 and on. No one likes that dull color anyway, and uses the brighter orange used before 1978 in its place.
Mark ACOC #1077

Offline Shayne

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rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2002, 07:40:00 AM »
I was talking to a friend of mine who will hopefully be repainting the cab of my clipper at some point this year. He owns a body shop.  I told him that I thought I could find the original paint recipes for the stripes in back journals and he said not to bother.  After 20+ years of weather, they aren't that color anymore anyway and any decent paint shop has color sticks. Same idea as the color tags for house paint, but more precise.  They just find the one that matches best and they know what color it IS, not what color it used to be  

But, if you're looking to do some touch up or do the work yourself, you might not have a choice but to rely on the original paint codes.
Shayne Barr
ACOC #3146

handyman

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rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2002, 04:51:00 AM »
Eric I'm interested in your rattle can paint job did it come out smooth or can you see any over laps also how long has it been on and hows it holding up to the weather and bug hits

egibbons

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rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2002, 06:06:00 AM »
Well, there were overlaps, but with two coats each applied in different directions, It came out pretty smooth. It all depends on your rattle can skills. Any even brief pauses will leave a sign. I'd recommend spraying with the temp about 60-65F. After a few days I used some Meguires #6 on it and it smoothed out real well. Before painting get some laquer filler putty in a tube and work out the divots.

The paint held up to the bugs and hits on a 2,000 mile trip to the Grand Canyon in June, but then it was brand new. No more reports available because I just sold the unit and am now a Clipperless American.

bigray

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rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2004, 05:37:00 PM »
Hi Folks,

I've had a hard time finding the Krylon paints. I call Krylon directly and you can order the paints by calling 1 (800) 441-4223.

They can tell you what retailer in your area has ordered a particular color as well.

Hope this helps!!

cat

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rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2004, 07:05:00 PM »
Just as a suggestion, I've sprayed the  contents of a "rattle can" into a container for air brushing.  Great control is obtained for touch up work as you can adjust the pressure to meet your skills.  Overspray is held to a minimum.

bigray

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rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2004, 12:42:00 AM »
Hi All,

Does anyone have the formula for the cab and body paint for the Clipper? I'm about to have my cab repainted.

Thanks!

Deborah Carvalho

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Taking off the rust spots
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2005, 03:07:34 AM »
I was wondering what you use to take off the rust spots before you paint? My cab has a few small (smaller than a dime) rust spots that I'd like to remove... help?

bigray

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rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2005, 11:33:49 PM »
Use some fine sandpaper (300 grit) to completely remove the rust. You might wish to use some primer to smooth things out!

Hope this helps!

Conrad

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sandpaper
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2005, 02:13:24 AM »
I use wet/dry sandpaper on all my body rust spots.  It is the black kind.  I would not recommend the brown type that is used for wood sanding.  For severe rust, chip away any blistered paint and use a  rotary sander/grinder.  The grinder is for really bad tough stuff.  

I use the rough grit for starters and end with a 600 grit and water.  body and paint books show you the steps to take.

Offline Toedtoes

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Re: rattle can paint restoration
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2015, 07:01:11 AM »
Topping for Jeanlouise38.
'75 American Clipper Dodge 360 821F; ACOC #3754